Did Aaron Boone Forget That The Yankees’ Bullpen Was Historically Good?

The power of the major league manager is in decline, and the role has changed in baseball’s information age. More and more power is concentrated in the front office, which constructs rosters and sets organizational philosophy. Yet there’s one traditional managerial responsibility that remains largely intact: in-game decision making. While the front office plays a role in game-planning in most organizations, the manager is ultimately making the real-time decisions. Tactical errors can be lost in the marathon of a regular season, but they are heightened and highlighted in the postseason.

New York Yankees manager Aaron Boone had a tough Monday. His Tuesday wasn’t much better. And in part because of his decisions, the Yankees’ season came to a close. The Boston Red Sox advanced to play the Houston Astros in the American League Championship Series beginning Saturday in Boston.

The Yankees entered the postseason with the most dominant bullpen in history by some measures, including wins above replacement (9.7) and strikeout rate (11.4 strikeouts per nine innings). Moreover, managers have never been more aggressive in employing their bullpens. Major league relief pitchers accounted for a record 40.1 percent of innings in the regular season. They absorbed a record 46.5 percent of innings last postseason. Entering LCS play, relievers have accounted for 48.8 percent of innings this postseason. But Boone seemed to forget that Yankees general manager Brian Cashman had spent the last two years building one of the most dominant relief units of all time.

After Sunday’s off day, with the series tied at 1-1, the Yankees started ace Luis Severino in Game 3. Severino struggled. The Yankees already trailed 3-0 in the top of the fourth when three straight Red Sox reached to open the inning and load the bases.

“Certainly in hindsight, when he doesn’t get an out, I’d like to have that back,” the rookie manager told reporters before Game 4 on Tuesday. “Being able to look back in hindsight, sure, go in a different way there.”

At that point, the Yankees had a 10.2 percent win expectancy, according to FanGraphs. Boone then exacerbated matters by calling upon Lance Lynn, hardly the top bullpen option available, with a 4.77 ERA in the regular season.